G-One Restaurant and Bar


It’s my wedding anniversary and Hubby and I decided it’s an occasion to splurge. Mike left the decision to me and I wanted to try Omakase. However the good ones are really expensive. I came across many good review on Goto Restaurant which have since changed its name to G-One Restaurant and no longer serve omakase, as reminded by the staff who took my reservation. I decided to give it a shot.

The last time I went to a really expensive Japanese restaurant was probably ten years ago. That restaurant, located at a Bukit Timah estate, had a door bell and did not accapt walk in. We enjoyed the food there.

G-One is located at Ann Siang Hill. The decor is casual and no hint of Japanese. We had a difficult time to order and  decided to seek the help of the Japanese proprietress. I decided since we are here, we should stick to cooked dishes as we can get sashimi from cheaper places. Prices were indeed steep and I wasn’t sure the portion size. I was sure I didn’t want dishes I can find at a much cheaper price at other Japanese restaurants like salad, sashimi, shishamo or tempura. After a long discussion, we settled for the below dishes.

Mike and I ordered the appetizer omakase consisting of 5 different appetizers at $18.

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I was dismay to find pieces of fresh tomatoes as one of the five. My sister-in-law told me she had once paid $10 for a tomato at a Japanese restaurant so she was not surprise to hear my story.

Tasting the appetizers is a fun play with senses as the different food gave delightfully different textures. I started with the extreme right, two pieces of roe. The crunchy morsels was a delight to chew. The tomato, I swear, tasted exactly the same as those I buy locally. Next was the escargot, whose chewy texture left more an impression than the taste. The jelly fish with cucumber in mayo was delicious. The last bowl of gooey stuff left us puzzled and we would have appreciated an explanation from our server but the three servers were very busy with the 8 tables.

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We were advised to try the fugu (puffer fish) sashimi ($35) and since I was plurging, why not? The thin slices of fish is tough and tasteless but when dipped into the spring onions, raddish-chili dip, was fresh and tangy. Again, it was the texture rather than the taste that left an impression.

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The deep fried persimmon ($12) was highly recommended and I enjoyed the sweetness of the dish.

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It’s unusual to find duck dishes ($16) in Japanese food and Mike cannot resist trying. To me, the cold dish tasted like smoked duck, nothing really extraordinary.

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The grilled kinme ($16) tasted very much like cod.

I wanted something filling but not a carbo dish and ordered the roast beef in red wine ($45). I wondered why the chef included this rather western style dish than a more Japanese cooking style. But other than rare beef briefly seared on the outside, this is the only beef on the menu.

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The last dish was a hot pot of simmered turnip and yam, topped with miso and yuzu ($18). The unique combination of salty miso and tart yuzu gave the bland turnip and yam a boost. We were surprised that the turnip is not sweet as our local one.

My beverage of choice was brown tea ($2) and Mike wanted to try the yuzu soda ($12). The yuzu soda came in a thin tall glass of ice. The yuzu soda at Watami is still the best I have tasted any where.

Other than the appetizer omakase which we each ordered a portion, the rest of the dishes we shared. The bill at the end was $251.88 including tax and service. I am glad for once we came out of the restaurant only 70% filled. Looking at how the other tables ordered, their bill would be in the $500 range.

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About vickychong

Just an ordinary woman.
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